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178 Past Due – The Past Due Radio Finale

by Derek Sisterhen on October 28, 2011

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Past Due: Radio 178 – The Past Due Radio Finale

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As the all-knowing They say: “All good things must come to an end.” After nearly four years of broadcasting, Past Due Radio went out with a bang. In honor of the finale, we welcomed back Justin Lukasavige, the original host of Past Due Radio (and current host of CoachRadio.tv), to reminisce and help us guide the ship back home one last time.

Today we discussed why the time has come to move forward from Past Due Radio. With transitions in my professional life, I want to continue helping those I come into contact with as effectively as possible. I’ll be doing so by helping Justin with CoachRadio.tv, collaborating on relevant subject matter like leadership, creating culture, and strategic planning (that actually works).

We relived, and even replayed, some memorable moments:

The Pontiac Caller – Just after GM stopped producing Pontiacs, one eager caller wanted to know if his truly would wind up a collector’s item. We had to break the bad news…

The 100th Episode – The epic opening musical sequence took me a long time to program into our soundboard, but it was worth every second!

The Jelly Beans – In true Past Due Radio community fashion, Tony rose to the challenge by sending us Harry Potter Bertie Bott’s Beans. Justin and I ate them on video and nearly tossed our cookies.

I’ve managed to ruffle thousands of feathers with my critique of those who steamroll their family members with Dave Ramsey’s Baby Steps. To date, The Dark Side of Dave Ramsey’s Baby Steps is the most-watched video we ever released on Past Due Radio. Justin helps all the critics of my video put down the pitchforks and torches on YouTube. And we even released a video in response to them, where I highlight the bright side of the Baby Steps.

It’s been an incredible journey with you, our fans and listeners. Thank you for the privilege of allowing me to host this show and inviting me to join you in the adventure of making this life truly count.

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Eat Healthy, Save Money

by Derek Sisterhen on October 11, 2011

Christine Luken, the Coupon Queen, is back to dispel some myths and give us some solid ways to save money on healthy foods. After Christine’s last guest post, it was clear we have some very discerning fans that are looking for ways to make products that are good for them also good for the budget. ~D.S.

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There’s a myth floating around out there that I am constantly trying to dispel. It goes something like this: “I’m eating healthy/organic/gluten-free, and there aren’t any coupons for the food I eat.” Or: “The only coupons I see out there are for processed and packaged foods.”

Let me set the record straight: You can eat healthy AND save money! The two are not mutually exclusive.

Now, it’s true that there are many coupons out there for products like Pop-Tarts, Rice-A-Roni, and Frosted Flakes. However, there are also coupons and deals to be had for Kashi Frozen Dinners, Cascadian Farms cereal, Udi’s Gluten Free Bread, and all-natural Luna Bars. You just need to know where to find them!

The first strategy you need to follow to save money on healthy food is to buy it when it’s on sale with coupons. Then you need to stock up on it so you have it on hand when it’s not on sale. This is known in couponing circles as “stockpiling.” Stockpiling does not mean you designate an entire room in your house to food storage. It simply means that you buy enough to last until the next sale. Never buy more of an item than your family will use before it expires. Things like organic cereal and granola bars have a reasonably long shelf life. You can freeze extra loaves of gluten-free bread when it goes on sale.

So where do you find coupons for organic and gluten-free products? It’s true that there aren’t too many of these in the Sunday paper (although you might spot a few.) The best ones I’ve found are online. Coupons.com frequently has printable coupons for Kashi products. With printable coupons, you can typically print two of any coupon per month per computer. So if you both you and your spouse have laptops and your kids have a desktop computer, you can potentially print six of the same coupon. You can also have friends and family members print some for you. Another great website for printable healthy coupons is MamboSpouts.com. I also recommend that you follow Organic Deals on Facebook. I frequently re-post deals they share for organic and gluten-free products.

Another way to get multiple coupons for healthy food is to search for them on E-Bay. Just type in the product name and coupon in the E-Bay search bar. There are quite a few “coupon clipping services” on E-Bay that will cut the coupons for you so that you can pay a few bucks for ten to twenty of a coupon. Let me give you a real-life example of this. Just a few weeks ago, I went to E-Bay and purchased twenty 50-cents off coupons for Luna Bars, an all-natural, 80% organic energy bar for women, for $6 shipped. My local Kroger doubles coupons so these are actually worth $1 for me. Guess what? Kroger sells Luna bars for 99 cents each. I use my coupons (usually five or ten at a time) to get my energy bars for free! My cost for the Luna bars was $6 for twenty, which is 30 cents a bar. 70% off isn’t too bad! Sometimes, people in other parts of the country, like Colorado and California, will get organic coupons in their Sunday papers that I wouldn’t get here in Cincinnati. Just make sure you are buying from a reputable seller with a good rating and that you’re buying original manufacturer’s coupons.

Do you have a favorite brand of organic or gluten-free food? If you write or email the manufacturer singing the praises of their products, they will frequently send you free coupons! It’s also a great idea to sign up for your favorite brands’ email lists and follow them on Facebook or Twitter. They frequently reward loyal followers and subscribers with printable coupons and free samples.

One last tip to reduce the cost of eating healthy is to use coupons for your non-food items. Even if you have a hard time finding good deals on your organic and gluten-free food, you can still use coupons to get your toilet paper, garbage bags, deodorant, shaving cream, dish washing liquid, and fabric softener for less. Now you can eat healthy without emptying your wallet!

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Christine Luken is a Coupon Queen, Financial Coach, and author of the e-book, Confessions of a Coupon Queen: Secrets Retailers Don’t Want You to Know. Christine has a passion for helping families save money so they can build up their savings and pay off their debt. In her spare time, you can find Christine on the golf course, at the mall shopping for shoes (coupons in hand!), or at home watching cage fighting with her husband. You can find her on her website or email her directly.

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175 Past Due – No More Free Lunches (Or Banks)

by Derek Sisterhen on October 8, 2011

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Past Due: Radio 175 – No More Free Lunches (Or Banks)

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Greg has been reading the news and seeing how banks are beginning to charge for previously free services. In particular, he noticed that Bank of America is preparing to charge customers $5 a month to use their debit cards. Greg asked: “First, how did this happen (that banks are charging fees like this)? And second, what does this mean for an average guy like me? How should I be vetting my banks?”

These are great questions. Oftentimes we assume that our bank has our best interest at heart, but we forget that they work for shareholders (which is why it’s a good idea to have your financial institution(s) in your mix of mutual funds, too). When things change, we figure the bank is out to get us; but the reality is that they need us, or else they wouldn’t be in business.

Today we discussed:

1) How banks actually work; why they offered free services for so long and what recent regulatory changes are forcing them to do differently.

2) The three questions you should ask to determine if your bank relationship fits your needs.

If you put a premium on relationships – having a banker that knows your name – recognize that those services cost money and may require you to pay for them. If you prefer free self-service banking options, just remember that you get what you pay for.

If you have a specific question, I’d be happy to answer it and further cultivate the wisdom of the Past Due Radio masses. The experiences of our listener base provide plenty of insight we all can learn from; don’t hesitate to ask – I’m happy to help!

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173 Past Due – Our Daughter Needs A Car, We Can’t Get A Loan

by Derek Sisterhen on September 16, 2011

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Past Due: Radio 173 – Our Daughter Needs A Car, We Can’t Get A Loan

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Robert and his wife Patricia are reaping a harvest of, admittedly, poorly sown financial decisions. They have a college-age daughter who is splitting the family vehicle with Patricia to get to and from classes, then to and from her part-time job. The family needs a car in the worst way, but no one is qualifying for a car loan.

In his submission, Robert acknowledged that they’ve been late on mortgage payments in the past, and are trying to clean up their finances, but now they feel limited with this incredibly inconvenient transportation situation.

Today we discussed:

1) How the pressure of inconvenience often drives us to rushed, unwise financial decisions. We must assess the true cost of paying interest on a used car (and likely subprime interest at that) in the context of the hassle-factor of sharing a vehicle.

2) The importance of Robert and Patricia openly confronting their financial situation for their children to see. It’s time for them to lead their kids – two generations of healthy money managers hang in the balance.

3) How sometimes the best course of action isn’t the most obvious. Robert’s daughter has already saved $3,000 toward the purchase of a vehicle and has the potential to save more than her parents.

This show exposed a lot of the systemic financial issues we’re seeing in American households with regularity: paycheck-to-paycheck living, financially unprepared children, the perpetuation of the “Sandwich Generation”, and knee-jerk decision-making in financial discomfort.

If you have a specific question, I’d be happy to answer it and further cultivate the wisdom of the Past Due Radio masses. The experiences of our listener base provide plenty of insight we all can learn from; don’t hesitate to ask – I’m happy to help!

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Saving Money Without Coupons

August 30, 2011

We haven’t talked about couponing much on PDR, yet I know many in our audience are coupon mavens. Christine Luken is the Coupon Queen and has made a name for herself by how easy she makes saving money with simple coupon strategies. But today, she’s going to show those who prefer not to tinker with […]

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170 Past Due – Should I Pay Down Student Loans Or Save For Tuition?

August 26, 2011

Past Due: Radio 170 – Should I Pay Down Student Loans Or Save For Tuition? Right-click to download Send me your feedback or leave me a voice mail: (919) 374-0501 Leave a review on iTunes Amanda is a rising college junior and is trying to make the best use of $500 a month in cash […]

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3 Lessons On Pregnancy & Money

August 23, 2011

Jon White is not only talking the talk, he’s walking the walk. It’s so exciting to think that he and his wife Lisa are welcoming their first child into a financially healthy home. For many families, the onset of children exposes cracks in the financial foundation.  If nothing else, these three simple ways to prepare […]

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167 Past Due – Where Does The Sandwich Generation Get Money For Bread?

August 5, 2011

Past Due: Radio 167 – Where Does The Sandwich Generation Get Money For Bread? Right-click to download Send me your feedback or leave me a voice mail: (919) 374-0501 Leave a review on iTunes My friend Bob is feeling the pain of being caught in the middle of a sandwich. This isn’t some weird food […]

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152 Past Due – Pay Off Debt or Save With Inheritance?

April 8, 2011

Past Due: Radio 152 – Pay Off Debt or Save With Inheritance? Right-click to download Send me your feedback or leave me a voice mail: (919) 374-0501 Leave a review on iTunes Trey wrote in a question about a $26,000 inheritance he and his wife recently received. We’ve heard from Trey before about his desire […]

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150 Past Due – Rent vs. Buy vs. Buy A Duplex?

March 25, 2011

Past Due: Radio 150 – Rent vs. Buy vs. Buy A Duplex? Right-click to download Send me your feedback or leave me a voice mail: (919) 374-0501 Leave a review on iTunes Today we talked through a very interesting real estate proposition, courtesy of Rodney. Rodney and his wife are a few months away from […]

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